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Saturday, May 22, 2010

CCAD Mourns Loss of Student - Hit and run victim from Friday passes away.away.


CCAD Mourns Loss of Student

 

The CCAD community is saddened by the passing of one of our students, Jeffrey Stevenson. Jeffrey, an Illustration major from Dublin, OH, who had just finished his sophomore year, was struck by a hit-and-run driver while riding his bicycle on Sawmill Road on Friday morning, May 21. He was taken to Riverside Hospital, but his injuries were too severe for doctors to revive him.Jeffrey was a bright and talented individual who showed much promise as a young artist. He was one of four CCAD students who had work accepted for the New York Society of Illustrators 2010 Exhibition and was known as an excellent student by his faculty. We grieve with the loss of our friend and student whose life has been cut short by this tragedy, and send our heartfelt condolences to his mother and other loved ones.
We will update our campus community when we know the details of the funeral arrangements. Our Counseling Center staff are available next week for those who need to talk with someone about their grief. If you are a student, faculty or staff member and feel you need to talk with someone immediately, please call 614.348.3320.

Friday, May 21, 2010

Bike Thief Gets Destroyed

Detours Top Tube Bag


large top tube bag
A tad larger than the classic GOODIE BAG. Accepts larger brownies and small, folding pets.  Simple Mini Bug frame adapter attaches to any tube in any position. Ideal for tandem stokers.
USE :: urban riding, long day rides, light+fast touring, centuries, event rides, fully loaded touring
VOL :: 48 in3
DIM :: approx. 6x4x2 in
WT :: 4 oz

Editor's Note: My friend Bethia purchased the Detours large pannier for shopping from Paradise Garage. I have been looking for a bag for my top tube for a while so I called Emily at PG to see if they had any. She ordered in several different styles for me to choose. I tried it on a ride and it works well for wallet, keys, camera and iPhone.

Green Drinks Bike Hop Recap

Highlights -
13+ riders
Gresso's (free shots for Bike Hop riders)
Taqueria Davanne for tacos
St. James Tavern (great beer selection)
Wild Goose Creative for Paul McCartney Roast/Music
Mileage didn't matter

Bicyclist Critically Injured In Hit-Skip; Sawmill Road Closed - NBC4i

Sawmill Road is closed Friday morning after a male bicyclist is critically injured in a hit-skip crash. 

Columbus police are on the scene of the crash atSawmill Road and Sawbury Boulevard, just north of Interstate 270, on the city's Northwest Side.
Police received a call about an unresponsive male on the side of the road at about 5 a.m. Friday. 
The male, who is in his 20s, was riding a bicycle southbound on Sawmill, near the curb, when he was struck by an unknown vehicle and thrown from his bicycle, police said.
The male was transported to Riverside Methodist Hospital in life-threatening condition. He remains in very critical condition, according to police.

Thursday, May 20, 2010

Ride of Silence 2010 Photos

GT Peace Tour - Under $1000 touring bike as seen at B1





  • EXTRAS:
    PC full coverage fenders

  • FRAME:
    GT Triple Triangle 700c touring design, Reynolds 520 butted tube set, Euro BB shell, standard 1-1/8" head tube, disc brake, rack and fender braze-ons, investment cast dropouts with derailleur hanger

  • FORK:
    GT touring design, 4130 cr-mo tapered blades and 1-1/8" steerer tube, disc mount, investment cast dropouts, rack and fender braze-ons

  • CRANKSET / CHAINWHEEL:
    FSA Tempo triple, JIS interface, 52/42/30, 7075 alloy outer ring, cr-mo mid. and inner

  • BOTTOM BRACKET:
    FSA cartridge sealed bearing, JIS cr-mo axle

  • PEDALS:
    Alloy touring with CP steel toe clips

  • FRONT DERAILLEUR:
    Shimano non-series

  • REAR DERAILLEUR:
    Shimano Deore, 9-Speed, top normal

  • SHIFTERS:
    MicroShif, bar-end shifters, 9-speed

  • CHAIN:
    KMC Z9200, 9-speed

  • RIMS:
    Jalco, X320 double wall, 700c, 23.5mm width, eyelets, 32 hole

  • FRONT HUB:
    Alloy, disc type, water resistant seals, alloy QR

  • REAR HUB:
    Alloy, disc type with 9-speed cassette, water resistant seals, alloy QR

  • COG SET:
    Sunrace, 9-Speed, 11-34

  • SPOKES:
    Stainless 14 guage

  • NIPPLES:
    CP Brass

  • TIRES:
    Schwalbe Delta Cruiser, 700x35c, puncture protection, reflective sides

  • FRONT BRAKE:
    Tektro, Lyra "Road" mechanical disc, 140mm Light-Wave rotor

  • REAR BRAKE:
    Tektro, Lyra "Road" mechanical disc, 140mm Light-Wave rotor

  • BRAKE LEVERS:
    Tektro, RL-340 alloy ergo road

  • HANDLEBAR:
    Alloy compact road design, 31.8mm

  • STEM:
    Alloy, 10 degree rise, 4-bolt 31.8mm clamp

  • HEADSET:
    TH, standard press-in 1-1/8" alloy cups, cage bearings

  • GRIPS:
    Suede type padded with 3-M adhesive, custom GT caps

  • SADDLE:
    Classic Regal road style, custom GT cover with antique brass like rivots, 7mm CP rails

  • SEAT POST:
    Alloy micro adjust, 2-bolt micro adjust head

  • SEAT CLAMP:
    Braze-on type with bolt

Wednesday, May 19, 2010

How Does Your State Rank in Bicycle Friendliness? - Bike League


To coincide with Bike to Work Week, the League of American Bicyclists is excited to announce our third annual Bicycle Friendly State (BFS) rankings. “We are delighted to report that states, and statewide bicycle advocates, are using this program to target legislative changes, adopt new policies and even start new advocacy groups in order to improve conditions for cyclists,” said Andy Clarke, League President. “Change at the state level is harder to see than in a community or business, but is no less important – and we are seeing real progress.”
At the top of the list are:
1. Washington
2. Wisconsin
3. Maine
4. Minnesota
5. Oregon

Tuesday, May 18, 2010

17 Could Get You 8 - Sierra Club

Sure enough, the Breezer Uptown 8 is one sweet commuter bike.

What's even sweeter? You could ride off with all eight speeds by writing just one 17-syllable haiku poem and posting one cool photo at Climate Crossroads. Just two weeks left in our salute to pedal-powered propulsion, so saddle up and enter the poetic fray!

Step 1Join the Bicycle group on Climate Crossroads (if you haven't already).

Step 2: Post your best bike-related photo.

Step 3: Add your 17-syllable haiku masterpiece.

Remember, the grand-prize winner wins an Uptown 8 bike, and two runners-up will get a Kryptonite lock and a Nutcase helmet.  



The webpage is here...

Bespoke: New York's Museum of Art and Design Features Handmade Bikes - FastCompany


Green Drinks Bike Hop - Thursday, May 20 - Gresso's, St. James & Thirsty Ear


From their email blast-

Especially for you (and your friends, family, etc.), we have planned a special Green Drinks bike hop event that will take our potable pelaton from Gresso's (6-7 pm) in German Village to St. James Tavern (7:30-8:30pm) in Italian Village to Wild Goose Creative (9pm on) in the North Campus area. At the final stop, riders will be treated to a musical-comedy Paul McCartney Roast ($3 cover for Green Drinks riders/$5 otherwise), and the tour will also include an opportunty to stop by Mikey's Late Night Slice to get some needed calories to power the pedals.

Team Green Drinks

Monday, May 17, 2010

400km Randonneur "Brevet" May 15th

This is truly the craziest thing I have ever done in my life. Ohio Randonneurs are in the business of ultra-long-distance bike trecks. This one was 400km (250 miles). Starting at Rt 23 and I-270, the route went Northeast to Lodi, by way of Butler, then turned west to Tiffin, then South to Columbus by way of Bucyrus. You had 27 hours to complete the ride, called a brevet. I made it in a less-than-stunning 25 hours, 5 minutes. The Randies have shorter rides (200-300km), and longer ones, (400-600km), but they all lead up to the Granddaddy of them all, the 1200km Paris-Brest-Paris Ride. (There are also a couple equivalent North American rides of that length.)

I had been planning for some time for this particular 400km event and was very faithful to the letter and spirit of the instructions provided on the Ohio Randonneur website. Therefore, when I showed up it distressed me to find most bikers on race bikes with nothing but a pack of chewing gum in their back pocket for good luck! No fenders, no racks, no bags, no nothing. (I exaggerate to some extent, but you get the idea.) I brought a loaded touring bike to the party, and it was clear after 35 miles that I would not be keeping up with the herd. This event was not "social" or friendly. Among the racing herd there is a competitive spirit. If you don't know your stuff, people are not there to explain it to you. The Randonneuring ethic is one of self-reliance and mental and physical endurance. I guess that's how it was in the beginning. Now things have evolved. There are two modifications I would make to my bike if I ever do this again. One is a front dynamo hub to supply electricity. This eliminates the need to carry, stop and change battery packs. Second is a GPS navigation system. I studied the route thoroughly and had map sets with me, but the problem is, you have to keep stopping to figure out your next move. GPS computers tell you where to turn on the fly, eliminating the mental-endurance part of the test. OK, so I did it the old-fashioned way, and plodded along, but, just the same, made all the control points in the allotted time.

Heading west out of Lodi, the skies began to cloud up, and a cold breeze was coming down off Lake Erie. Later it began to rain. So, I was glad I packed rain gear both for warmth and to keep dry, even though neither cold nor rain were expected. Along the way I met up with another loaded tourer by name of Doug. It was a good thing I met this guy, little did I know he would save my skin on the coming night ride. Made Tiffin at nightfall. Made Bucyrus around midnight. Doug rolled in a little bit after me. He offered me one of his battery packs. I had one charged one left, which was good for three hours, but we had 5 hours to go. I had two Cateyes as spare lights, but out in the countryside in the dark of night they are virtually good for nothing. I had badly miscalculated how much juice I would need to get through the night. In fact, I thought I would knock the whole thing off in 20 hours. But Doug had experience and could see I wouldn't make it. I gratefully accepted his help. Doug and I agreed to travel together through the night for safety's sake. Biking through the night after being awake for twenty hours is probably similar to the all-night marches that occurred during the Civil War.

At one point we missed our turn. Taking a good hard look at the maps I brought along, we decided to take a road parallel to the designated route until there was an opportunity to cross back to it. This is not in strict conformity to Randonneur rules, but when you have been at it for 22 hours, you cease to care about such things! Well, it might have been better to care about it, because the parallel road was full of viscous potholes. And when it couldn't get worse, it turned to gravel. We stopped to access the situation. Fortunately we both had beefy tires to withstand the coming punishment, and after pinging and tractoring and wobbling this way and that, after what seemed like eternity, we made it out of there - Only to discover this sign - BRIDGE OUT, ROAD CLOSED. A nightmare that never ends? We decided to check it out and see if we couldn't ford the stream. Anything but return by that gravel road! The bridge was down in a ravine. Fortunately, the bridge was built, we only had to go around the barriers to use it. After that we were back on track. We were getting close to the end at this point, and were surprised to meet two other Randies. They had missed a turn earlier in the day and had gone 14 miles off course and 14 miles back to get on track, for a total of 28 extra miles. Just talking about it hurt. The word "hill" hurt at this point. My posterior hurt, it had been well broken in by my Brooks saddle, rather than the other way around. So, this is my conclusion: what some call misery, pain and discomfort - Randies call that everyday life! Crossing Polaris Parkway the sun started to rise and by 6:05 the four of us - the final four of 45 cyclists - arrived back at the starting point.

Brett

This week in bicycle rides - May 17

Bike to Work Challenge - Sign up here!
Tuesday Night Ride - 7pm start at Goodale Park - route changes weekly - Like it at the Facebook page
Ride of Silence - Wednesday May 19th, 7pm from State House - More information here.
Green Drinks Bike Hop - Thursday May 20th,  - more info on their website

Ride to Dawes Recap - 051610

Highlights;
9 riders to start.
I was cameraless, but Molly came to the rescue.
Liz decided she wasn't ready for the pace/distance
Picked up three at the first major road turn who rode in from town. (11 riders if counting)
Headwind for first half of ride.
Amy dumped her bike because she didn't clip out fast enough.
Picnic lunch at Dawes with my wife and all the riders.
Tailwind on return.
National Trail Raceway was in full swing, we stopped to watch the action for a few.
Caused mini stampede with mini moo cows after mooing at them.
Stopped a dog in it's track with my loud dog whisperer techniques.
Four riders raced ahead to the final turn and waited
Amy dumped her bike because she didn't clip out fast enough. (yes, twice)
60 miles total