Search This Blog

Sunday, April 22, 2012

Bicycle injuries: Is the right-of-way fight getting ugly? [CNN]


Editor's note: CNN chief medical correspondent Dr. Sanjay Guptainvestigates traffic deaths among New York City bicyclists on "Sanjay Gupta, MD," Sunday April 22 at 7:30 a.m. ET on CNN.
New York (CNN) -- Michelle Matson has a nagging reminder of the cycling crash that could have killed her. A year and a half later, flecks of asphalt remain lodged in her skin.
There's also the metal pole extending from her kneecap down to her ankle, along with countless screws, keeping her left leg intact.
"My body was destroyed," said Matson, an artist living in Brooklyn. "My whole life was put on hold for months, and no one seemed to care."
New York City artist Michelle Matson was hospitalized in 2010 after being hit by a speeding car as she rode a bicycle in Brooklyn.
New York City artist Michelle Matson was hospitalized in 2010 after being hit by a speeding car as she rode a bicycle in Brooklyn.
It happened in October, 2010, on what Matson and her boyfriend, James Paz, thought was an innocuous bike ride home from a concert.  
"I was riding in front of Michelle, about 10 feet in front of her," Paz said.  "I heard a loud scraping, scratching noise, there was a second of blackness, and then I was flying through the air."
What had lofted Paz into the air was a speeding driver who, according to witnesses, fled the scene. Paz hobbled to his feet, noted the mangled remains of his bike and scanned the area for Matson. 

0 comments:

Post a Comment