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Saturday, August 24, 2013

In Dayton, Giving Out Free Bikes To Keep Cars Off Campus | Forbes


Anyone who’s visited a college campus lately — or who is about to drop off kids for the new school year — knows that parking is at a premium. Now, the University of Dayton is joining other schools across the country by giving bikes to students who promise not to bring a car to campus.
The program kicks off next week, with the first 100 bikes going to freshmen who entered a drawing earlier this year. The incoming students had to promise not to bring cars to campus during their first two years at the Ohio school. The drawing attracted almost 300 entries, according to the school.
The Dayton program is an outgrowth of the school’s existing bike-sharing program. Over the past two years, bikes have been checked out more than 4,500 times, with 3,000 checked out in the last year.
Male students will receive a Linus Roadster Sport and female students will be given the Linus Dutchi 3, all equipped with three-speed shifters and rear carrying racks. The bikes, and safety helmets, will be presented to students during a special ceremony on campus next Friday.
Colleges have been trying to discourage their students from bringing cars to campus for years. Universities that have offered free bikes to students include The University of New England in Biddeford, Maine, and Ripon College in Wisconsin, according to The New York Times. [Keep reading at Forbes]

It Pays to Be Courteous! | PinkBike


It Pays to Be Courteous! on Pinkbike

The Hornit 140 decibel cycle horn | YouTube

[The Hornit]

Friday, August 23, 2013

How Biking Improves Employee Productivity | triplepundit.com

The business case for bicycling sounds obvious to sustainability enthusiasts. However, making it stick requires a generous leap of faith or two. We need to first make the case that an employer should have any opinion at all about how employees get to work. Then, we must also consider why it might be in employers’ best interests to invest in employee bicycling by providing bike racks, changing rooms and showers, or even offering financial incentives to employees who ride.
Why in the world would they do that? Why would an employer undertake an additional expense, with all the pressures already weighing on the bottom line, except perhaps to polish their image as a benign employer, one who provides a nice place work, to attract high caliber employees? One could always write it off as a recruiting expense.
Not so fast. Before we go there, we should consider the difference between an expense and an investment. An expense is money that is being spent in order to maintain the operation of a business. An investment is money spent with an expectation that it will somehow increase profitability.
Today, we’re going to ask you, Mr. Employer, to consider making an investment in your business by supporting bicycling among your employees.
We are going to suggest that you will recoup your investment in the form of increased productivity. There is ample evidence to support that proposition.
[Keep reading at triplepundit.com]

Wheels of Change: the Rise of Bicycling in America

biking
Bike enthusiast Marissa Huber gears up for her daily commute
Bicycling in America is changing: it’s getting bigger, better and broader.
Always linked with freedom and fun for kids and fitness for adults, bicycling is becoming fashionable. Just watch any evening hour of network TV: nearly half the commercials you see — for cars, insurance, mobile phones, cereal or whatever — will show smiling, healthy people riding bikes.
Grown-up bicycling for short trips has moved from the quirky category (see Steve Carell in The 40-Year-Old Virgin) to stylish and hip (see Leonardo DiCaprio on a New York Citibike in Us Magazine). Thankfully, the changes in bicycling go way beyond image.
Bike riding in big U.S. cities — especially for commuting and other short trips — has nearly doubled in the last decade. Most mayors and city councils view bicycling as a cost-effective solution — a transportation choice that helps reduce traffic congestion, air pollution, and the costs related to providing parking. City leaders are mindful of one, simple statistic: half of all the trips Americans make are three miles or less. Cities all across the country are investing in better bikeways and supporting the highly visible addition of short-term bike rental systems (bike sharing).
This has been the summer of bike-sharing in America. After impressive launches in Europe and Canada, sophisticated, automated bike rental systems hit the ground in Denver and Minneapolis three years ago. Washington, DC, soon followed.
At first, the usage figures were modest. This year, however, the game has changed dramatically as New York  (Citibike), Chicago (Divvy), and other large-scale American city systems debuted. Today — and every day during Daylight Savings time — close to 100,000 trips will be made on U.S. bike-share bikes. This is a big enough number to change the face of the urban experience…and generally, it’s for the better.
Just about every U.S. city that has installed a bike-sharing system has made simultaneous investments in bike infrastructure. Many cities are building separated, protected bikeways that appeal to inexperienced bike riders who won’t pedal if their only separation from fast-moving motor vehicles is a white painted stripe on the pavement. (Unfortunately, the old-school bike lane remains the state-of-the-art in too many places.) Meanwhile, the number of separated green lanes in U.S. cities has doubled in each of the last two years, and this trend seems certain to continue.
U.S. mayors see clear links between bikeways and business. Cities compete fiercely to attract corporations, and many pay special attention to the dynamic companies — particularly in the tech sector — that hire highly educated, highly motivated workers. Mayors know that these firms want to locate in cities where (among other things) it’s easy to live a compact lifestyle and get around on a bike...

Amazon gives a push to biking downtown | Seattle Times


Amazon plans to build a two-block cycle track around its future office towers on Seventh Avenue. This rendering shows the extension Amazon proposed at 7th Avenue and Blanchard Street.
Enlarge this photo
NBBJ
Amazon plans to build a two-block cycle track around its future office towers on Seventh Avenue. This rendering shows the extension Amazon proposed at 7th Avenue and Blanchard Street.
Almost single-handedly, Amazon.com has driven the recent downtown Seattle office market boom. Now, at its massive, three-tower Denny Triangle development, the online retailer is raising the stakes for what companies can do to encourage bicycle commuting.
Amazon will build “cycle tracks” on Seventh Avenue along the two-block stretch of its office complex, demonstrating what a downtown network of dedicated bicycle lanes could look like.
The company also will provide stalls for about 400 bikes in each of its towers — three times the number of bike spaces required under city code and many more than other office projects provide.
A cycle track is a bike lane with a physical barrier to separate bicyclists from cars and pedestrians. City planners envision 101 miles of cycle track throughout Seattle, including along Second, Fourth and Seventh avenues downtown, but the proposed network requires City Council approval and funding.
“Cyclists are part of the fabric of Seattle, and so we’re thrilled to be creating a new cycle track that will make the ride to and from downtown safer and easier for all cyclists in the community,” said John Schoettler, Amazon director of global real estate and facilities.
The scale of Amazon’s redevelopment will give planners an unusual opportunity to design the highest-quality cycle track, with 7-foot-wide riding paths and a line of trees to separate the cyclists from other traffic, said Dongho Chang, city traffic engineer for the Seattle Department of Transportation.

Bike the C-Bus 2013 @bikethecbus registration with shirt ends TODAY. REGISTER NOW! #letsride


REGISTER TODAY! Bike the C-Bus is celebrating our SIXTH year! The ride is a fun way to explore a few of the neighborhoods in and around Columbus. Experience segments of the King Lincoln District, Woodland Park, Olde Town East, Downtown, Short North Arts District, Italian Village, Harrison West, Victorian Village, Arena District, Franklinton, Brewery District and German Village.

The entire ride will cover approximately 25 miles over 4 segments and will feature stops that highlight change that is occurring in our neighborhoods. Each stop will be sponsored by businesses and community groups and provide snacks, drinks and entertainment for the riders. The ride is configured to allow cyclists to complete segments if they do not feel comfortable riding the entire route.

The $30 registration fee includes an official 2013 Bike the C-Bus t-shirt (if you register by August 23) and wristband along with drinks and food at designated rest stops, plus a free lunch at the hospitality tent. Online registration ends at NOON on Friday, August 30, 2013. On-site registration on Friday evening and Saturday morning will increase to $35.

Bike the C-Bus is the region's premier cycling event celebrating design, health & fitness, and urban lifestyles. “Bike the C-Bus” is considered a ride and not a race and will offer a variety of course options to accommodate everyone from recreational riders to hard-core fitness enthusiasts.
REGISTER TODAY!

Are you on twitter? Tag your tweets #bikethecbus
Website
Facebook Page

Thursday, August 22, 2013

The Most Compact Urban Folding Bike Ever | Treehugger



Yes, that's a full-sized bicycle in there.
Innovations in folding bikes have helped urban cyclists cram their vehicles into tiny apartments for years now--and the designs keep getting better and better, and smaller and smaller. And this new folding bike concept by Victor Aleman may take the cake--as you may or may not be able to tell, even the wheels fold up on this bad boy. 
From Tuvie:
The compactable bicycle concept was driven from the need of boosting urban space efficiency when it is not in use or being transported. The wheel is made of six modules, each with double pivot in their joints, allowing the wheel to be folded and become smaller.
So let's just take a look at how this wheel breaks down here: Treehugger

Gravel Worlds 2013 | Vimeo


Gravel Worlds 2013 from nocoastfilms on Vimeo.

S-Works McLaren Venge | Specialized

When we set out to design the Venge, we wanted to create the fastest complete performance bike in the world. Until now, aerodynamic road bikes have sacrificed too much of the bike – too much stiffness lost, too much weight added. We simply weren't willing to compromise.

Aerodynamics is only one part of the formula. We knew this bike needed to combine the wind cheating elements of the Shiv with the stiffness and lightweight aspects of the Tarmac. Today, our stiffness testing, weight numbers, and wattage testing all confirm that we achieved something that, until now, had never been done before. It's more bike than aero.

[See specs at Specialized]

Jens Voigt: One more year | YouTube

Wednesday, August 21, 2013

Cop Allegedly Knocks Woman Off Bicycle To Give Her A Ticket | Gothamist


082013bikecop.jpg 

(Via Daniel Flanzig)
Thanks to the arrival of Citi Bike, there's been an appreciable increase in cops ticketing cyclists. What cops are still figuring out, apparently, is how to get the cyclists stop without knocking them off their bicycles into traffic!
25-year-old Emily Dalton alleges an officer did just that as she was pedaling her bike to work the morning of July 11. Dalton was riding along 8th Avenue in Chelsea when she glided through a light—she's uncertain whether it was red or green. But according to at least one nearby officer, it was red—and she'd just ridden through it. His method of detaining her? The officer grabbed her handlebar as she passed, jolting Dalton from her bike and sending her sailing into the road.
082013scrape.jpeg 
(Via Daniel Flanzig)
Dalton, stunned and bloodied—though not seriously harmed—said she spent several minutes shouting at the officer, unable to understand why someone whose job it is to keep her safe was the reason she'd nearly been smashed by a car in the middle of 8th Avenue. "I was terrified," she said. "I was in the middle of a New York street!"

[Keep reading at Gothamist]

Seach For Driver Who Struck Bicyclist | 10TV




Police were searching for a driver who struck a bicyclist early Wednesday morning.

This happened just before 3 a.m. near Cleveland Avenue and 2nd Avenue.

The person on the bike was not seriously hurt.

Police say the suspect was driving a blue Nissan Versa.

Authorities say it’s not clear who was at fault, but say the driver took off without checking to see if the victim was ok.

http://www.10tv.com/content/stories/2013/08/21/columbus-bicyclist-struck-cleveland-avenue.html

What Happens When a Town Puts People Before Cars?



Nearly three years ago, a Minnesota man named Charles Marohn published a piece called "Confessions of a Recovering Engineer" on the blog of his not-for-profit organization, Strong Towns. In it, he describes the priorities that he learned in his training as an engineer: first comes speed; then traffic volume; then safety; then cost.
Following those principles, Marohn was designing wider, faster roads to cut through the hearts of American towns. He discovered that the people in those towns often pushed back, asking why trees and sidewalk space had to be sacrificed in order to widen the road, and how their children could possibly be safer with cars whizzing by at top speed.
Armed with the prestige of his chosen profession and a pile of studies and guidelines that explained why bigger was always better, Marohn would explain that "these standards have been shown to work across the world," and that people who objected to the loss of trees and yard space and peace for their families were simply wrong.
Then, unlike many engineers, he started thinking about the human consequences of what he was doing:
In retrospect I understand that this was utter insanity. Wider, faster, treeless roads not only ruin our public places, they kill people. Taking highway standards and applying them to urban and suburban streets, and even county roads, costs us thousands of lives every year. There is no earthly reason why an engineer would ever design a fourteen foot lane for a city block, yet we do it continuously. Why?
The answer is utterly shameful: Because that is the standard.
Marohn, as the title of his piece implies, has rejected the standards he learned in school. He now travels the country spreading the word that things can be done differently – that America’s towns and cities can build streets that are safe and operate at a human scale, the old-fashioned way, and that they can save money and bolster their economies in the process...

Garmin presents VIRB

The AJ List: 9 Bikes That Changed The Sport | Adventure Journal

An early version of the Breezer, circa 1977
An early version of the Breezer, circa 1977
We’ve all gotten a little overexcited about bikes from time to time, and why not. Every since we learned balance in motion, new avenues of liberation were opened to us. Throughout history, a handful of bikes have changed—really changed—cycling. We’re not talking “7 percent lighter” here, we’re talking “feels like a whole new sport.” In chronological order:
1. The Velocipede, aka The Boneshaker, 1864
Before 1864, the closest thing anyone had to a bicycle was the “Walking Machine”—essentially a bicycle without pedals, or an adult-sized Strider bike. In 1864, a documented purchase of a pedal-driven two-wheeled vehicle, the Velocipede, was recorded. Its pedals were attached directly to the front wheel hub (so it was also the first fixie), and it was made completely out of wood (including the wheels/tires), giving early adopters a bumpy ride, and earning it the nickname “The Boneshaker.” The Michaux family sold the machines in Paris, and the Velocipede became one of the bigger asterisks in bicycle history: The family may have used Pierre Lallement’s pedal-driven wheel design, which he patented in the United States in 1866.
2. Safety Bicycle, 1876
In 1876, Harry (or Henry) John Lawson designed what came to be known as the world’s first “safety bicycle”—most men at the time rode around on high-wheel pennyfarthings, which placed the rider high above the ground. The safety bicycle used a chain-and-sprocket design, and put the rider lower, with feet in safe reach of the ground.

[Keep reading at Adventure Journal]

'Bullshit 100' and the allure of off-pavement road riding - UPDATED | BikePortland

Bullshit 100 ride-2
The beautiful roads near North Plains
were a cakewalk compared to what was to come.
(Photos © J. Maus/BikePortland)
Riding "road" bikes on gravel and dirt roads is experiencing a major boom in popularity here in Oregon. On Sunday, I joined a dozen other intrepid riders for the "Women's Bullshit 100" ride to found out why.
The BS 100 is one of a growing number of events on the annual calendar that lives in a hybrid space between official event and just a bunch of friends getting together for a ride. Thanks to a region full of bike adventure lovers, these type of rides are growing like weeds. A pioneer in this style is the Ronde PDX, an unsanctioned ride through Portland's West Hills that attracts thousands of eager participants each year. Another prime example is VeloDirt, whose founder Donnie Kolb has become something of a legend for his epic annual events such as The Dalles Mountain 60 and the Oregon Stampede.

[Keep reading at BikePortland]

Ride Your Bike | YouTube

Tuesday, August 20, 2013

What if bike comfort is more important than bike safety? | Green Lane Project


When I'm standing near the edge of a high ledge or cliff, I know, rationally, that I'm unlikely to fall. I've spent most of my life without spontaneously tumbling sideways, and standing on the edge of a cliff doesn't change that.
I know, statistically speaking, that I am almost completely safe.
But that doesn't mean I like to stand near the edge of a cliff.

When I'm in the front seat of a roller coaster, I know, rationally, that my body is extremely safe. Tens of thousands of thrill-seekers have raised their hands in the air without being harmed.
But that doesn't stop me from being scared of raising my hands in the air in the front seat of a roller coaster.

When I'm riding my bike along a five-lane arterial road, I know, rationally, that the professional truck driver next to me is statistically unlikely to suddenly swerve to his right, crushing and killing me.
But that doesn't mean I like to bike on a street like this:

Last week, I interviewed a man whose main ideas about street design have been rejected by mainstream bike advocates in the United States: John Forester, founder of the "vehicular cycling" concept. Because cars and bikes rarely collide when they can see each other, Forester and his allies argue, people should ride bicycles where they are most visible: right down the middle of standard traffic lanes. Protected bike lanes modeled on those in Northern Europe, they argue, move people on bikes to the side of the roadway where they're harder for people in cars to see.

[Keep reading at Green Lane Project]

OK commercial: Cycling | YouTube

Monday, August 19, 2013

Franklinton Cycleworks' Third Annual Swap Meet is this Saturday August 24th from 10am to 2pm.


This year, the event is happening in tandem with 400 West Rich's Farmers Market. In addition to finding deals on great used bike stuff, you can also purchase locally grown organic produce! Food trucks, music, and Jeni's Ice Cream will round out the event, while free bike tune-ups/consultation paired with a raffle make this an event the cycling enthusiast can't miss. 

The Details in Brief:

What: Franklinton CycleWork's Third Annual Swap Meet
Where: 400 West Rich
When: Saturday August 24th, 10 am - 2 pm
Details: Bicycle Swap Meet, food trucks, music, Jeni's Ice Cream, raffle, fresh produce, bike repair

Franklinton Cycleworks is still accepting vendors for its Swap Meet! Who can be a vendor you ask? Anyone who's looking to sell or trade their bike stuff including parts, accessories, bikes, clothing, gear, even memorabilia. In years past, we've had nearly 15 vendors. This year, due to the larger space, we can host many, many more.  

* We ask that vendors make a contribution to Franklinton Cycleworks, a non-profit with the mission of eliminating barriers to cycling while building local community, should they make any sales.

To Register as a Vendor, please email Jonathan at info@franklintoncycleworks.org with the subject of Swap Meet Registration. Please feel free to email Jonathan with any questions as well. You provide the bike stuff, we'll provide everything else. 
https://www.facebook.com/events/179667105543448/


Knog wins patent fight with Chinese factory | Bicycle Retailer

Drawing from Knog's patent application.
Drawing from Knog's patent application.
RICHMOND, Victoria, Australia (BRAIN) — Accessory brand Knog said it has won an intellectual property fight in Australia against a Chinese factory. The litigation involved Knog's Australian patent on a silicone-strap LED headlight.
Knog said the factory, which it did not name, will be paying royalties to Knog as it sells its remaining stock of the relevant lights, which includes lights marketed under the Tioga, Cassons XTech, PedalNation and Diamondback brands. Knog has an Australian Innovation Patent on the design. According to the Australian patent office web site, an innovation patent "lasts for 8 years and is designed to protect inventions that do not meet the inventive threshold required for standard patents."

Bike the C-Bus 2013 @bikethecbus registration with shirt ends August 23rd #letsride


REGISTER TODAY! Bike the C-Bus is celebrating our SIXTH year! The ride is a fun way to explore a few of the neighborhoods in and around Columbus. Experience segments of the King Lincoln District, Woodland Park, Olde Town East, Downtown, Short North Arts District, Italian Village, Harrison West, Victorian Village, Arena District, Franklinton, Brewery District and German Village.

The entire ride will cover approximately 25 miles over 4 segments and will feature stops that highlight change that is occurring in our neighborhoods. Each stop will be sponsored by businesses and community groups and provide snacks, drinks and entertainment for the riders. The ride is configured to allow cyclists to complete segments if they do not feel comfortable riding the entire route.

The $30 registration fee includes an official 2013 Bike the C-Bus t-shirt (if you register by August 23) and wristband along with drinks and food at designated rest stops, plus a free lunch at the hospitality tent. Online registration ends at NOON on Friday, August 30, 2013. On-site registration on Friday evening and Saturday morning will increase to $35.

Bike the C-Bus is the region's premier cycling event celebrating design, health & fitness, and urban lifestyles. “Bike the C-Bus” is considered a ride and not a race and will offer a variety of course options to accommodate everyone from recreational riders to hard-core fitness enthusiasts.
REGISTER TODAY!

Are you on twitter? Tag your tweets #bikethecbus
Website
Facebook Page

Sunday, August 18, 2013

Video: Red Bull Joyride 2013 Event Recap | Pink Bike

Six lessons for Portland from the League's new 'Women Bike' report | Bike Portland



woman on a bike
Common, but not quite common enough.
(Photos © J. Maus/BikePortland)
Even in Portland, people who really ought to know better (links to FB) still claim now and then that biking is a thing for young dudes.
Still, in a town where only 31 percent of people on bikes tend to be female (it's about 25 percent nationally) we've got a long way to go until, as in Germany or the Netherlands, our biking population is evenly split by gender. Portland's failure to change this ratio for 10 years can be discouraging to people who think everyone deserves to feel welcome on a bike.
That's why there's a lot to celebrate in a new report by the League of American Bicyclists that rounds up dozens of statistics about women and bikes. Culled from industry reports, political polls and academic studies, a few of the report's figures are pretty surprising...