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Saturday, June 7, 2014

Lost your bike? Then give it a ring! GPS bell connects to a smartphone to locate your bicycle | Daily Mail



  • Bike bell uses Bluetooth Low Energy to connect to a cyclist's smartphone
  • When a cyclist walks away, they break bluetooth connection to the bike
  • App will automatically drop a pin on map so they can later locate the ride
  • The bell even rings out loud as cyclist’s smartphone gets close to location
  • Device is currently a prototype and there are no plans to commercialise it

  • If you thought Amsterdam was a bike-friendly city, then think again. Each morning, the region’s train stations become swamped with a tide of wheels and frames.
And each evening, confused cyclists attempt to pick their way through the mass of metal in an attempt to find their ride in the crowded racks.
Now, a Dutch duo has invented a gadget that they claim will make finding bikes easier during the daily commute.
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A Dutch-due has come up with a gadget that they claim will make finding bikes easier during the daily commute. Their device comes in the shape of a GPS bicycle bell which connects to a rider's smartphone to direct them to their bike
A Dutch-due has come up with a gadget that they claim will make finding bikes easier during the daily commute. Their device comes in the shape of a GPS bicycle bell which connects to a rider's smartphone to direct them to their bike

HOW DOES THE BIKE BELL WORK?

The bike bell gadget by Frolic uses Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) to connect to a user's smartphone.
When a cyclist parks their bike and walks away, they break the bluetooth connection to their bike and the app will automatically drop a pin on the map on their phone.
This gives the general location of bike using GPS. And with BLE, users can then use their phone to even more precisely locate their bike’s position. 
In the insanity of these bike parking lots, this may still not be enough. So Frolic have added the ability to remotely ring the bike bell directly from an app on the user's smartphone.
Their device comes in the shape of a GPS bicycle bell which connects to a rider’s smartphone to direct them to their bike.
 


If you thought Amsterdam was a bike-friendly city, then think again. Each morning, the region's train stations become swamped with a tide of wheels and frames. And each evening, confused cyclists attempt to pick their way through the mass of metal in an attempt to find their ride in the crowded racks
If you thought Amsterdam was a bike-friendly city, then think again. Each morning, the region's train stations become swamped with a tide of wheels and frames. And each evening, confused cyclists attempt to pick their way through the mass of metal in an attempt to find their ride in the crowded racks
They started with a regular bike bell then removed all the components in the interior. They then added back in custom electronics and 3D-printed parts.
The system connects to an iPhone via Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE). Walking away after from the bike drops a pin on to the smartphone's map, allowing GPS to guide the rider back.

[ Read more at dailymail.co.uk ]

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