Search This Blog

Saturday, October 31, 2015

GAP/C&O Adventure Ride Recap & Photos - Day 6 Brunswick MD to Washington DC #letsride

Brunswick to Washington DC. 57 miles. Cold in the morning. Mid-morning breakfast at White's Ferry. Stopped and talked to a cyclist who was at the end of his cross country trip. Visited the Great Falls Park to see the whitewater. Made it to the end of the C&O trail and saw the elusive marker. Rode across town to the Amtrak station. Rolled bikes onto the train with only a few minutes to spare. Relaxed on the Amtrak train back to Pittsburgh. Ate late dinner at Primanti Brothers. 

GAP/C&O Adventure Ride Recap & Photos - Day 5 Hancock MD to Brunswick MD #letsride

Hancock to Brunswick. Longest day in the saddle with 72+ miles. 30 degrees in the morning. Started on the Western Maryland Rail Trail and picked up the C&O outside of town. Stopped at a picnic area and had lunch. Saw and explored a number of caves along the way. Passed by Harpers Ferry and stayed in Brunswick at Brunswick Family campground. Since it was end of season there were very few campers around. Hot showers and clean facilities. Small bonfire in the evening.

GAP/C&O Adventure Ride Recap & Photos - Day 4 Cumberland MD to Hancock MD #letsride

Cumberland to Hancock. 60 miles. We said goodbye to Doug in the morning in Cumberland. He headed back to Rockwood. Headed through the Paw Paw Tunnel. I broke a spoke somewhere along the way and we decided to ride the Western Mayland Rail Trail into Hancock to limit any more damage. Stayed at C&O Bicycle Bunkhouse where they repaired my wheel. BBQ dinner in town. Big bonfire in the evening. 

GAP/C&O Adventure Ride Recap & Photos - Day 3 Rockwood PA to Cumberland MD #letsride

Rockwood PA to Cumberland MD. 45 miles. Our friend Doug joined us for the Friday camping and Saturday ride. Lots of train noise at this campsite, otherwise it was decent for the cost. Crossed Salisbury Viaduct and stopped at the Meyersdale train depot museum. Crossed the Eastern Continental Divide and passed through the Savage Mountain Tunnel. Rode up to the depot at Frostburg and watched the train get turned. We stayed at the Ramada in Cumberland and had dinner at Baltimore Street Grille. Toured some architecture and history across the river. Stopped at Curtis Famous Hotdogs for second dinner.

GAP/C&O Adventure Ride Recap & Photos - Day 2 Round Bottom campground to Rockwood PA #letsride

Round Bottom to Rockwood PA. 56 miles. It was chilly and foggy when we started the morning. The sun warmed us up and it was clear by Ohiopyle. Black Hawk helicopter flyover as we stood on the rail bridge. We had lunch and small repair in Ohiopyle. Camped at Husky Haven Campground in Rockwood. Lots of train noise. Campground is trail side and has lots of firewood. Note: Great facilities in town across the river.

GAP/C&O Adventure Ride Recap & Photos - Day 1 Pittsburgh to Round Bottom campground #letsride

Pittsburgh to Round Bottom campground. 49 miles. Lunch in West Newton. Met some other travelers heading south at Roundbottom Campground. Water was non-potable. Rained everytime Phil wanted to setup his tent. Dinner in the shelter. Lots of train noise. Temps were warm.

Morning Ebb And Flow - Copenhagen Rush Hour


Morning Ebb And Flow from jim slade on Vimeo.

Friday, October 30, 2015

THE 12 TYPES OF BIKE COMMUTERS | @semi_rad

bike commuter
Everyone knows there are two kinds of people in this world, but did you know there are 12 types of bike commuters? That’s right. Here they are. You might be, or have been, or know someone who is, one of them. Or more. Or maybe there are more than 12 types.
Apprehensive Neophyte
  • Pedals onward despite visible terror
  • Will evolve to other type of bike commuter after 15-20 more bike commutes
Righteous Indignatius
  • Commute has higher purpose than the standard just-getting-to-work utilitarianism. Is for fitness, for environmental reasons, possibly enlightenment, for avoidance of psychological fatigue that comes from driving in traffic every day. Still every once in a while is affected by traffic or individual drivers who try to kill him/her, must scream or give finger to cabbie/pizza delivery driver/texting driver drifting into bike lane

Thursday, October 29, 2015

Bicycle Safety Camp

The story of “ghost bikes”: How a bike memorial in St. Louis sparked a global movement @grist

Valentine Vanesse
You’ve probably seen a ghost bike. Maybe its skeletal white frame, locked to a street sign on a busy corner, blended into the madness of a hustling urban backdrop. Or perhaps the makeshift memorial emanated its phantomly presence chained to a single lamppost along a lonely country highway. No matter the location, ghost bikes turn an indiscriminate patch of road into a solemn reminder: A cyclist was killed here.
These bikes represent a sobering reality. From 2000 to 2013, rates of commuting via bike have increased more than 100 percent in some parts of the country. Fatalities and injuries have increased, too. In 2013, roughly 48,000 cyclists were injured. More than 740 were killed in crashes with motor vehicles. And that’s just accidents reported to the police. Biking, be it in a metropolis or a whistle stop, can be a continuous flirtation with death if you’re not careful. Cities aren’t off the hook when it comes to making streets co-habitable for both bikes and vehicles. Ghost bikes remind city planners as well as cyclists and drivers that simple mistakes can result in dire consequences.